Michigan State University
July 30, 2016 - 4:56:00 am (America/Detroit)
Blog: Red Tape   Categories: History

On July 30, 1997, the Supreme Court overturned two lower court decisions and ruled that charter schools are constitutional.

The future of charter schools in Michigan had been at stake in the case, which began in 1994 when the Council of Organizations and Others for Education About Parochiaid brought suit claiming the authorization of charter schools by the state was unconstitutional.

Source : MIRS Archives.



July 30, 2016 - 4:51:00 am (America/Detroit)
Blog: Red Tape   Categories: History

On July 30, 1975, Jimmy Hoffa left home for an afternoon meeting with Anthony (Tony Jack) Giacalone, a reputed crime capo in Detroit, and Anthony Provenzano, a New Jersey Teamster boss known to friends as "Tony Pro." On that night he disappeared, never to be seen again.

For more information, see Pat Zacharias, "The day Jimmy Hoffa didn't come home", Detroit News, August 28, 1999 and a Detroit News Photo Gallery.



July 30, 2016 - 4:41:00 am (America/Detroit)
Blog: Red Tape   Categories: History

The purchase, which quadrupled Chrysler's size, was criticized, but Walter Chrysler defended his decision. "The Chrysler Corp. got the huge Dodge foundry and forges, which enabled it to increase production to other models," Rosenbusch explained. "By getting the existing Dodge dealer network, the company was able to expand into markets that it didn't have a share of, especially overseas."



July 30, 2016 - 4:30:00 am (America/Detroit)
Blog: Red Tape   Categories: History, Native Americans

Company K of the 1st Michigan Sharpshooters

A contingent of 150 Native Americans who comprised Company K of the 1st Michigan Sharpshooters during the Civil fought in major battles and included Odawa Indians from Emmet County, where their descendants live today. (Other members came from the Michigan Chippewa and Potawatami tribes, and a few even came from Canada.)



July 30, 2016 - 4:29:00 am (America/Detroit)
Blog: Red Tape   Categories: History, Native Americans

On July 30, 1864, the Union forces detonated four tons of black powder in a tunnel that had been dug directly under the Confederate works at Petersburg. The blast cut out a crater in the earth around twenty-five feet deep and about 250 feet across. Four divisions of Union troops, rushed into what they thought was a break in the enemy earthworks, only to have 4400 of them killed that afternoon and evening as the Rebels counterattacked.



July 30, 2016 - 4:28:00 am (America/Detroit)
Blog: Red Tape   Categories: History

"Among our troops was a company of Indians, belonging to the 1st Michigan Sharpshooters. They did splendid work (at the Battle of the Crater), crawling to the very top of the bank, and rising up, they would take a quick and fatal aim, then drop quickly down again"

Lieutenant William H. Randall of Company I, captured during the Battle of the Crater, remembered that the "Indians showed great coolness. They would fire at Johnny and then drop down. Would then peak over the works and try to see the effect of their shot."



July 30, 2016 - 4:20:00 am (America/Detroit)
Blog: Red Tape   Categories: History

Born on July 30, 1863 on a Dearborn, Michigan farm, Henry Ford created the Ford Model T car in 1908 and went on to develop the assembly line mode of production, which revolutionized the industry. As a result, Ford sold millions of cars and became a world-famous company head. The company lost its market dominance but had a lasting impact on other technological development and U.S. infrastructure. Ford died on April 7, 1947.



July 29, 2016 - 3:21:00 pm (America/Detroit)
Blog: Environmental Studies   Categories: Environment News Items

It’s a toothy giant that can grow longer than a horse and heavier than a refrigerator, a fearsome-looking prehistoric fish that plied U.S. waters from the Gulf of Mexico to Illinois until it disappeared from many states a half-century ago.



July 29, 2016 - 3:14:00 pm (America/Detroit)
Blog: Red Tape   Categories: Flint Water Crisis

Arrogance and viewing people in Flint as expendable were the motives of six state employees criminally charged Friday over the city’s water crisis, Attorney General Bill Schuette said.

Genesee County Judge Nathaniel C. Perry III authorized charges requested by Schuette Friday against three employees in the Department of Health and Human Services and three employees in the Department of Environmental Quality, including fired municipal water chief Liane Shekter Smith.



July 29, 2016 - 3:00:00 pm (America/Detroit)
Blog: Red Tape   Categories: Dome

Lawrence Glazer:  Police Science
What are the facts about use of force?  Read



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